Saturday, November 11, 2006

A Visual History of Photographic Technology Over the Centuries










24 comments:

Anonymous said...

:) that was cute!!!! :)

Lori Witzel said...

Nice and witty! But...how did they get that butterfly to hold still for the daguerreotype?

;-)

I'm well, and finally back trolling thru the blogosphere post-work-overload...hope you're well, have been enjoying your pics!

Cergie said...

WAOW !
That's so interesting to see all these different effects
At the beginning they had not the choice, but now, I'm not sure the more artistic is the more faithful to reality

Anonymous said...

oh, I love these pictures. I like nr. 7 the best, I think. Althought I don't know why. And if I look at them again, I might decide on another one. lol

Endment said...

great effects!

Sarad said...

wow!

sage said...

a nice series!

M(urf)! said...

Mr. Creative, you forgot to change it into neon to reflect the 1980's. ;-) I love the second picture. I'm a sepia tone kind of girl.

Ginnie said...

You sure are having fun with this, Tim, aren't you! :)

Anvilcloud said...

Neat idea. very creative.

Corinne said...

Lovely series! A pleasure to scroll through the different photos.

Tim Rice said...

Thanks, moi. I recently upgraded to Corel Paintshop Pro Photo 11 and this historical function was one of its features. I had fun playing with it.

Hi, lori witzel. Glad you enjoyed it. Didn't you know that I'm a master at hypnotizing butterflies? ;) It's nice to see you back and I know how one's schedule can get overfilled.

Hi, cergie. Glad I could share this presentation with you. As for what is more artistic, I think that depends on the perception of the viewer.

That's neat, choochoo. Sometimes it is hard to decide which one likes best.

Thanks, endment. I like playing with effects and seeing what one can create.

Thanks, sarad. History can be impressive, can't it?

Thanks, sage. It was fun developing this series with its historical theme.

Thanks, murf. But one can't include every facet of history in such a sort post. ;)

Hi, ginnie. If I'm not having fun, then I better find a new hobby. :)

Hi, anvilcloud. It is fun being creative this way.

Thanks, corinne. Glad I could provide you with such a pleasure. It was a pleasure to work with this medium.

Minka said...

Depth and clarity comes with age :)

M(urf)! said...

That is true, Tim. Does that mean that Part II is coming soon? :-)

Dia said...

oOOoOo so many wonderful colours!! :) Very nice :)

San Nakji said...

I love Photoshop! You have presented this very well. I love the subject too! Insects make great photos I think.

Jon Cox said...

VERY BEAUTIFUL!!!!

Mile Stones said...

It's a very good point Tim, nicely put. 150 years of technological progress and suddenly anyone with a little magic box with a handy few megapixles, a pc, some simple software and eyes and hands can produce great photography - and get it out around the world in a few minutes. It's incredible what has happened in less than a decade. And the bonus is that we all get to know each other better this way!

Tim Rice said...

Hi, minka. Great comment! Thanks for coming by.

Hi, murf. At this point, I have no plans for a part two; but who knows what time will bring? ;)

Thanks, dia. We are blessed that our eyes recognize so many wonderful colors.

Thanks, san nakji. I had fun pulling this together with the aid of Corel Paintshop Pro Photo 11.

Thanks, jon cox. Isn't it amazing how we can adjust colors and find new beauty in the photo distinct from the others?

Hi, mile stones. You sum up so succinctly and well the marvel of modern photographic technology in comparison to the not so distant past. And I love that the internet enables this sharing of photos and ideas with one another. It makes you and the rest of the world more real to me. I gain friendships and appreciation even for the people I do not meet by the contacts I do make via this blog.

Anonymous said...

interesting .. but what are the names of these technologies .. have you read the color theory?

Are the pictures under various aaa .. modes of light i.e. xray, infrared and so on?

Sarad said...

very impressive, indeed.

Tim Rice said...

The photos reflect different photographic processes over the course of history. The first represents a daguerreotype that was widely in use from about 1839 to 1855, the second - albumen from 1855 to 1890s, then cyanotype, platinum, and so on down the line. I do not have much knowledge about color theory. The knowledge I have here came from the program I used to create these different photos.

Thanks, sarad. It was fun creating this post.

Anonymous said...

I love the pictures...it is so amazing what one can do on this darn old computer, if you just have the right program.....Right?

Tim Rice said...

Hi, judypatooote. It is amazing what technology does allow us to do. But the better the picture is to start with, the better the end result will be.